All posts by kpughmisc@pughkilleen.com

Decompose Scenarios for Simpler Scenarios

A blog question on relative dates by Gojko Adzic triggered a blog post by Seb Rose.   The two blog posts showed there are many shades of gherkin.  I’d like to use the example in those two posts to demonstrate a couple of facets of scenario decomposition. This uses a slightly different shade than Seb’s.

Continue reading Decompose Scenarios for Simpler Scenarios

  A Few Shades of Gherkin For Business Rules

A blog on specflow.org talked about ways to document scenarios for a business rule.   It reminded me about some aspects of blog wrote a few years ago called Six Shades of Gherkin.    Here’s the business rule that was used as the example in specflow.org blog:

A volume discount rule provides 10% off for purchases between 5 and 10 items, 15% for purchases between 10 and 20; and 20% above that.

One of the issues with business rules is making sure they are understood by the entire triad (customer, developer, tester).    In this example,  what is the discount for 10 items?    One way to document is to use a scenario outline that gives the results for each side of each breakpoint.   Another important value is documenting the results at the limits and beyond. Continue reading   A Few Shades of Gherkin For Business Rules

Acceptance Tests and the Testing Pyramid

There is a common testing pyramid that many organizations use regarding end-to-end, integration, and unit tests. Analogous to this pyramid, acceptance tests that are developed by the triad (customer unit, developer unit, and tester unit) can be applied at various levels. This blog entry relooks at the context diagram shown in this article, but from the standpoint of testing. Continue reading Acceptance Tests and the Testing Pyramid

Using Context and Flow Diagrams For a Big Picture

It’s helpful to understand the big picture of an application before getting down into the details. The context diagram and the workflow diagram are two ways to show it. This big picture helps in creating acceptance tests for the system that have minimal redundancy and ease of maintenance. In order to demonstrate the two diagrams, I’ll use an example of an on-line ticket ordering system. Continue reading Using Context and Flow Diagrams For a Big Picture