Tag Archives: #BDD

A Behavior Perspective on Development

I like to try multiple different approaches to solving a problem to see how they compare.  I might learn something from one approach that I could apply to another.   As an example, I created an alternative approach to calculations with fractions.  The fraction idea comes from J.B. Rainsberger’s class on Test Driven Development. It is a great demonstration of TDD.  

In this example, I’m going to use Gherkin as the specification language for the customer facing behavior For applications where the external behavior and its component parts are specified by the customer and/or stakeholders, having examples in Gherkin can dramatically decrease the communication impedance between the customer and the developer.   PDF is here. HTML is here.

A Flow Perspective

Some agile practice articles discuss how individuals should be organized into teams and work
collaboratively. Other articles describe how product backlog items/features and sprint backlog
items/stories/tasks should be estimated and scheduled. In this article, the flow perspective focuses on how customer or business value is delivered. This flow is sometimes shown with value streams, story maps, customer journeys, workflows, or other means. Understanding and making the flow visible can help with organizing the other views of agility. The article in html is here. The article as a PDF is here.

Use Your Ubiquitous Language in Your Design

When the Triad (Customer, Developer, Tester) have a conversation about a requirement such as a story, domain terms often come up in the conversation. These terms could represent the elements in a requirement, such as a loan amount or an interest rate, or a type applied to the elements, such as Dollar or Percentage. They could also represent actions, such as charge interest.

Eric Evans describes these terms as a Ubiquitous Language. Understanding these terms is crucial to creating a shared understanding of the requirement. But do you just leave the terms in Jira or Sharepoint? If so, then you’re missing an opportunity for creating a good design. Continue reading Use Your Ubiquitous Language in Your Design

The Gilded Rose Kata from a Gherkin Perspective

In reviewing a book, I was reminded about the Gilded Rose kata.   It revolves around some legacy code that has no tests.   You need to make some changes to the code to support a new requirement.   The kata was created by Bobby Johnson (http://iamnotmyself.com/) and updated by Emily Bache (http://coding-is-like-cooking.info/).   

A detailed explanation of the Gherkin approach is in this PDF.   An html version is here. The code that the PDF references is at https://github.com/atdd-bdd/GildedRose .   There is one function that has not been refactored yet.  It’s left as an exercise to the reader.  

You can compare this solution to other solutions to the Gilded Rose kata to see alternative ways to approach this problem. 

Layers of Scenarios and a Reply on Randomness

 

Gojko Adzic asked for opinions in his blog “How to Specify Something Should Be Random.  He presented alternative scenarios and asked for your choice.

The situation he described is having a robot’s chat response appear like it comes from a human being. There could be multiple levels of tests associated with this requirement. Let’s take a look at these levels and along the way give my choice(s) for an answer. Continue reading Layers of Scenarios and a Reply on Randomness

Decompose Scenarios for Simpler Scenarios

A blog question on relative dates by Gojko Adzic triggered a blog post by Seb Rose.   The two blog posts showed there are many shades of gherkin.  I’d like to use the example in those two posts to demonstrate a couple of facets of scenario decomposition. This uses a slightly different shade than Seb’s.

Continue reading Decompose Scenarios for Simpler Scenarios